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How Late Nights at the Office Can Harm Your Heart

How Late Nights at the Office Can Harm Your Heart
From TIME - July 14, 2017

Its no secret that working long hours can take a toll on employees moods, stress levels, and even their waistlines. Now, a new study suggests a hidden heart danger, as well: People who put in more than 55 hours a week on the job may have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillationan irregular heart rhythm linked to stroke and other health problemscompared to those who work 40 hours or less.

The new analysis, published in the European Heart Journal and led by University College London researchers, combined data from eight previous studies including more than 85,000 men and women from the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. None of the participants had atrial fibrillation (also known as AFib) at the studys start, but 1,061 people developed it over the next 10 years.

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Those numbers were equivalent to 12.4 AFib cases per 1,000 people in the study. But when the researchers looked specifically at those working 55 hours a week or more, that rate jumped to 17.6 per 1,000 cases.

In other words, those who worked the most were 40% more likely to developing AFib, compared to those who worked 35 to 40 hours a weekeven after the results were adjusted for factors such as age, gender, obesity, socioeconomic status, smoking status, risky alcohol use, and leisure-time physical activity.

Whats more, 90% of those cases occurred in people who did not already have cardiovascular diseasesuggesting that it really was the excess time at work, and not any pre-existing condition, that was responsible for the rise in AFib.

The authors point out that a 40% increased risk of AFib may not be a big deal, depending on how high a persons overall risk for heart disease already is. In absolute terms, the increased risk of atrial fibrillation among individuals with long working hours is relatively modest, they wrote. But for someone who already has several risk factors (like being older, male, diabetic, or a smoker, for example), any added risk could be important.

The researchers cant say how, exactly, extra time on the job might trigger irregular heart rhythms. But they suspect that stress and exhaustion may play a role, making the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous systems more vulnerable to abnormalities.

They also say their finding could help explain, at least partially, why people who work long hours have been shown to have an increased risk of stroke. ( AFib is known to contribute to the development of stroke, as well as heart failure, stroke-related dementia, and other serious health problems.)

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