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Alzheimer's nutrient drink falters in clinical trial

From BBC - October 30, 2017

There is no good evidence that a nutrient drink being sold online in the UK to "help" people with early Alzheimer's actually slows the disease, say experts.

Latest trial results in patients who took Souvenaid did not find it preserves memory and thinking.

The authors say in Lancet Neurology that bigger studies are needed to show if the product can work as hoped.

And consumers should be aware that the 3.49 per bottle drink "is not a cure".

Manufacturer Nutricia says its drink should only be taken under the direction of a doctor, specialist nurse or pharmacist.

What is the drink?

Souvenaid comes in strawberry or vanilla flavour and contains a combination of fatty acids, vitamins and other nutrients.

Taken once daily, the idea is that the boost of nutrients it provides will help keep Alzheimer's at bay in people with the earliest signs of this type of dementia.

But the latest phase two clinical trial results do not prove this.

What the trial found

The study involved 311 patients with very early Alzheimer's or mild cognitive impairment. All of them were asked to take a daily drink, but only half were given Souvenaid - the other half received one with no added nutrients.

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